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Rosa TFC: First impressions & Ollantaytambo anniversary | part I

Posted at November 19, 2013 | By : | Categories : Mosqoy Stories,Peru,Random,Weaving communities | 0 Comment

I arrived in Cusco two weeks ago, sleepy eyed and all. Juan, Kristina and Raul (a Mosqoy student studying tourism) greeted me with a sign that said, “Bienvenida Rosa.” It was a warm welcome! Since arriving in Cusco I have been getting to know the basics such as students’ names, how to navigate Cusco on the combi system (small privately owned buses that zip through Cusco and act as the transport system), as well as good places to eat. Cusco itself is a delightful city with the occasional alpaca crossing the street and Incan ruins scattered along the surrounding Andean mountains.

My first night at Casa Mosqoy, I was thankful that I was so exhausted that the music echoing throughout the hallway did not keep me from going early to bed. Now, I have adjusted to the Casa Mosqoy orchestra of music, laughter, and chatter, and they have all become comforting sounds of the daily activities of new friends. Every weeknight the students have been cooking delicious dinners and in the morning a hot drink is prepared. I love waking up to a hot drink in the morning! The students have been helpful and welcoming to me, and I believe I will make some lasting friendships in the Casa Mosqoy house.

On my second day in Peru we went to Ollantaytambo’s 138th anniversary festival. On the combi ride there I got a short Quechua lesson from one of the students and gazed at the beautiful snow-capped mountains whizzing by. Upon arriving in Ollantaytambo I was struck by the magnificent Incan ruins that can be seen from the town square; I noticed many people dressed in traditional brightly coloured clothing.

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Women in traditional dress ahead of us in the Ollantaytambo anniversary parade.

The Mosqoy students arrived at different points, all smiling and giddy to be in the Ollantaytambo anniversary parade. It was a hot day but everyone was smiling. After a long wait, we walked across the stage with our Mosqoy banner in front of hundreds maybe even thousands of people. The loudspeaker shouted, “Mosqoy! Educar, Preservar, Conectar (Educate, Preserve, Connect)!” It was a quick debut that lasted all of 30 seconds and afterwards we took some group photos before everyone split for lunch.

The Mosqoy students arrived at different points, all smiling and giddy to be in the Ollantaytambo anniversary parade. It was a hot day but everyone was smiling. After a long wait, we walked across the stage with our Mosqoy banner in front of hundreds maybe even thousands of people. The loudspeaker shouted, “Mosqoy! Educar, Preservar, Conectar (Educate, Preserve, Connect)!” It was a quick debut that lasted all of 30 seconds and afterwards we took some group photos before everyone split for lunch.

Mosqoy students after Ollantaytambo parade.

Mosqoy students after parade.

After lunch I had the chance to try chicha, a traditional fermented drink made from corn. In all honesty it had a strange taste, but I am willing to try it again! My stepmother always says to try something eight times before you decide you do not like it. Afterwards we danced to traditional Huayno music and made it back to Cusco just after dark. The whole anniversary was super fun; it was a good introduction into the Mosqoy community in Peru!

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Cheers with a cup of chicha!

Exciting upcoming events are the Tinkuy, a three day long weavers gathering, and Ashli’s arrival in Peru. My next blog will include some of what I learned at the Tinkuy as well as my first trek to the Mapacho River Valley communities. Stay tuned!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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